Sunday, July 10, 2011

Farm-fresh barramundi, mate?

The July 18 issue of TIME magazine has a cover story titled "The future of fish: Can farming save the last wild food?"

The piece focuses on a "perfect" farmed species called barramundi, native to Australia, and makes two major points.

First, fish farming might help save wild fish, because without aquaculture the pressure to overfish would be greater.

Second, with a world population of nearly 7 billion and rising, we have no choice but to farm the sea just as we've long farmed the land.

Says the article: "It's not that commercial fishing will disappear; in fact, sustainable fisheries like Alaska's wild-salmon industry may even produce boutique foods, finally earning what they're worth."

8 comments:

JIM said...

farmed barramundi here is the equivalent of Thailand's basa(catfish),milky flesh with no taste unless covered in some sauce.wild caught anything is the only way to go. Queensland au.

Anonymous said...

Aye mate! P.S. how many lbs. wild caught fish to raise that 1 lb. of milky flesh? Cant feed them corn-would cut into our ethonol!

Anonymous said...

3-7 lbs. of wild caught fish ground up to get 1lb. of farm salmon. also add the artificial coloring,bactericides,herbicides,anti-biotics,hydrogen peroxide baths,and slice baths.

Anonymous said...

Does anyone eat beef? Pork? Chicken? Be mindful of hypocrisy...

Anonymous said...

Whitefish is treasured for its ability to take up a sauce. Long live halibut! Or for the more economically minded, long live pollock!

Commenter #1 misses the point. Markets want cheap, dependable supply. Tilapia taste good.

Anonymous said...

I see that Time magazine needs to do a little more research on the demise of the King Salmon in Alaska rivers as I quote from their article, "....sustainable fisheries like Alaska's wild-salmon industry ....". The healthiest "wild-salmon industry" is the sockeye in Bristol Bay.

Anonymous said...

try telling the hundreds of barra farms that have gone broke or on there way that markets want cheap fish,,the markets just want to make massive profits.

Anonymous said...

If this tastes as bland as does tilapia, or has as poor texture it is rubbish. How many of these farmed fish are going to be eating fish meal from ocean caught "bait fish" which would otherwise feed larger wild fish?