Thursday, April 13, 2017

'No trespassing'

State officials are refuting claims of exclusive Native fishing rights at Kodiak.

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

True story I heard from an inside source, native groups across the state are having secret meetings for something 'big' this summer. I can't say what it is but its going to change the whole game, this advert is the first step.

Anonymous said...

thank you for the truth ADFG!

Anonymous said...

"In 1943, Alutiiq people from the village of Karluk became owners of a portion of the Shelikof Strait...That year, Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes created the Karluk Reservation, granting Karluk Natives ownership of a 35,000 acre reservation and the liquid real estate that abutted the reservation’s 15 miles of coast line, out to 3000 feet into the Shelikof. Karluk villagers were thus granted control over the waters adjacent to very productive fishing grounds.

Karluk villagers were granted these fishing grounds because it was from this resource that they derived their livelihood."

Anonymous said...

4:04 The truth is this land and all of its resources were stolen from the true owners.

Anonymous said...

11:29. That could literally be said about every race of people who ever existed anywhere on the planet. Just because it happened here more recently doesn't make a difference. I know first hand how it is to break into the fisheries as a young man.... When's the last time you saw food stamps and welfare help someone get ahead, never. We need to stop making distinctions like this. It only breeds racism hatred and animosity. In the end it usually just hurts the people it is trying to help.

Anonymous said...

So disrepectful of ADFG to say "native" instead of "Native"

Anonymous said...

11:29 If conquest is just part of history, I guess you won't feel so bad when your assets are taken? I'm sure you'll be the first to cry foul when things aren't going your way.

You are totally off base, its not about welfare or food stamps its about giving people freedom to live their traditional way of life. Native people should not fall under the overbearing hand of state and federal regulations. Leave that life to your kind.

Anonymous said...

If one does not want to fall under the hand of another, then one should get off the other's tit.

This entire mess of racial division must stop for everyone's best interests. Integration is the only healthy answer. United we stand, divided we fall. No such thing as a person being born superior to another, that comes from conditional training. These unfounded racial superiority rights do not belong in any healthy society. As long as we continue to ignore this absolute true core of the problems, none of the lesser issues will be truly resolved. They become mired deeper in festering wounds of twisted policy, regulation, and law.

Anonymous said...

When my grandfather arrived in kodiak at the turn of the 21st century he learned the ways of the precious native peoples, without these skills the white settlers never would have made through the difficult winters.

Anonymous said...

It's not that hard to figure out if you read the news release. Every Native reservation except Annette Island was revoked under ANCSA. So there is no longer a Karluk Reservation. Therefore, the village cannot legally claim exclusive fishing rights to those waters of the Shelikof they describe in their advertisement.

No one is saying the residents of Karluk cannot fish in front of the village and live a traditional lifestyle. They are welcome to do so, and hopefully they do. But does a traditional lifestyle include commercial fishing? The Karluk River has an amazing run of sockeye, pink, and silver salmon that provides both food security and economic opportunity for residents of Karluk village. But, the village cannot claim exclusivity to the resource per the Alaska State Constitution.

Anonymous said...

7:25 You are spot on on this issue. Until the Philosophy of one race having more rights than another is permanently discredited there will be war.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loFDn94oZJ0

Anonymous said...

ANCSA did not relinquish the rights of aboriginal entities the right to barter or trade the resources available adjacent to their communities. It did address exclusive rights but it did not restrict access and harvests necessary to accommodate sufficient means to sustain the community. Meaning, conservation is still the mandate of the State and preference to maintain resources in a sustainable manner and in times of scarcity, the right to restrict access from non-residents. In ANCSA and ANILCA the discussion never resolved aboriginal access to the resources as being separate and apart from other State users, but there clearly is a right to an established (subsistence) priority. One question that has the means for standing in Federal court. All Alaskan navigable waterways are included and the discussion was not clearly concluded even though the issue was discussed. The State adopted limited entry and partially addressed the local established communities as part of a point system. The problem is that neither the State nor the Federal government has every come to terms of equitability for aboriginal integrity.

Anonymous said...

Expect to see these guys around.

https://www.akingump.com/en/experience/practices/american-indian/index.html

Anonymous said...

One question is: who''s paying for the ads in the Kodiak daily mirror describing the reservation and the 'commercial'fishing rights? And what is the goal? Will we see action taken by Karluk Natives and legal action against them and a resulting court case?

Some lawyer somewhere sees an advantage to publishing the ads. What's the next step?

Anonymous said...

Screw the Karluk River

Anonymous said...

I wonder if this has anything to do with Bobby T starting Alaska Native Inter-Tribal Association of Seiners? Things that make you go hmmmm.......

Anonymous said...

There is a corresponding UAA SOA FED program called the Salmon Fellows that is now in play. They give $10,000 to each Fellow that they choose to be a part of this. They are centered around the concepts of native rights, more conservation and no resource development. I thought we were in a budget crunch? UAA continues to support frivolous programs and then cries that they can't take a reduction in their funding?

Anonymous said...

Nice try 1:45, that has nothing to do with attempts by Natives to get sole rights to fisheries.

UAA bashing elsewhere